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Look out Dolby Atmos, DTS just entered the next era of surround sound with DTS:X

 

 


Date: 2015-04-14

DTS:X is an object-based codec that is similar to rival Dolby counterpart Atmos system. It will cater to home theater and possibly even the headphone market. Processing not require specific speaker requirement; the receiver may calculate on the fly where the sound for an object or object should go.

Like Dolby Atmos, DTS:X is a surround sound solution for both commercial theaters and home theaters. The system allows for individual sound objects — such as a helicopter, or a buzzing fly — to move freely throughout a hemispheric sonic space, constrained only by the imagination of the sound mixer. DTS is hoping to make its new system more accessible than Dolby’s Atmos, however, by making it easy to use with the hardware that’s already installed in theaters and homes, and by offering the tools to mix movies in DTS:X to movie studios for free. That’s right: it will cost movie studios nothing to make the move to this new format.

For the home, DTS:X will be scaled down a bit, just like Atmos. For now, the system will support up to 11 speakers and two subwoofers. However — and this is a big deal for home theater owners, DTS:X can accommodate up to 32 different speaker locations, meaning the system can maximize the surround experience, no matter where you have to put your speakers. The system will work with nearly any speakers you might already have, possibly even Dolby Atmos-enabled speakers, which reflect sound off of the ceiling by firing upward from the ground so users don’t have to install overhead speakers.

As for receivers, DTS:X will initially land in Denon’s AVR-X7200, and Marantz’s AV8802 through firmware upgrades expected sometime this summer. The new system will also be implemented in upcoming receivers from the likes of Yamaha, Onkyo, Pioneer, and several others slated to land this year and next. While the system is designed to work for multiple mediums, including broadcast TV and streaming video, it will debut in the home on Blu-ray disc, just like Dolby Atmos. Unfortunately, we likely won’t get DTS:X and Dolby Atmos on the same disc — there’s just not enough room.

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